Category Archives: depression

How to Deal with Depression as a Christian

Full disclosure: I don’t believe in much. I am currently an atheist, or agnostic, or whatever. This may come as a blow to a few members of my family, and I’m sorry if this is how you’re learning about my leaving the fold. Please don’t tell Grandmother. That said, we’ve got strong love for one another, so I think we’ll be cool.

If I don’t believe in anything, why do I think I get to tell you about the Christian path through depression? Because I lived it. I was a believer until around the age of 22, and I was depressed and anxious… always. The whole time.

If you’re a Christian struggling with depression, you’ve gathered that your religion has positives and negatives when it comes to coping. You know that your church community can be helpful sometimes, and other times not so much. You may also agree that being depressed as a Christian feels… wrong somehow. Like a failure. If faith as a mustard seed can move mountains, is your faith broken? ... continue reading.

On Despair

I wrote the following about a week ago. I was feeling¬†really¬†depressed, and I wanted to get some thoughts out while I was in that state. It didn’t go far:

There’s something that a lot of people don’t understand about depression. It’s not about feeling sad. Sadness is okay. Sadness and happiness are like your left and right hand, each equal in dignity, each wonderful in its own clumsy, apeish way.

It’s not grief. Grief is an expression of joy turned on its head, a recognition of the ripple left in the world by a beloved person or thing. Anger is passion denied, hatred is love forsworn. The line between these concepts is so thin as to be imaginary, a product of our lack of self-knowledge.

So what is depression? Sadness, you see, would be too kind. Sadness would mean wistfulness, a longing for things lost and for things never to be. Sadness is a comfort that we create in the lulls between ecstasy, a burial shroud meant to be folded and kept with our other treasures. When we are sad, when we grieve, it’s the moment our feet touch the ground between leaps. ... continue reading.